Burrowing Owl at sunset 

   
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New River Wetlands survey day
Jan 12, 2002 
-Bob Miller

A visit to both sites on a beautiful winters day. For directions and the official cumulative bird list for both sites  click here! 

71
species (today's list follows at end of page)

Click on thumbnail pictures for full-sized shots.

                    

It takes all kinds! Some thoughtful citizen had decided that the wetlands project would be a nice place to dump their trash. The many pay for the few and this was the reason some of you found the gates closed to the Brawley site this winter. There has been a new fence installed to separate the NRW from the US ag research station and the wetlands are now open! The wetlands are open to all LEGAL activities. If you witness unlawful activities, jot down some info and contact me, together we can keep the wetlands the wonderful place that it is!

Ahhh, the wetlands, instant blood pressure reduction! Common Yellowthroat and Marsh Wrens, chattering and flitting through the bulrushes, let you know who owns that territory.


NRW Brawley site


Common Yellowthroat


 I have twice seen American Bittern at the Brawley site and Least Bittern are seen regularly at both sites. American Coot, Pied-billed Grebe and Common Moorhen have taken up permanent residence.

 

  

     


Sora!


Sora can be seen regularly too! Song Sparrow are here and a Lincoln's Sparrow or two can be found this time of year. Waterfowl, herons, gulls and terns, the wetlands attract the widest number of species in the winter. 

     

Lincoln's Sparrow


Northern Mockingbird


White-crowned Sparrow 

Birding between the sites is just as much fun. The fields and canal banks can hold many surprises. Do not overlook the vegetation along the sides of the hills overlooking the wetlands while you are busily oohing and ahhing at what is on the ponds! This Burrowing Owl has taken up residence along the dirt road going into the Imperial site. I am always fascinated by their unusual feet! 

 
Burrowing Owl

   
New River Wetlands & nearby areas, Jan. 12, 2002

Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Least Bittern
White-faced Ibis
American Wigeon
Green-winged Teal
Mallard
Northern Pintail
Cinnamon Teal
Northern Shoveler
Ruddy Duck
Turkey Vulture
Northern Harrier
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Gambel's Quail
Virginia Rail
Sora
Common Moorhen
American Coot
Killdeer
Long-billed Curlew
Greater Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Ring-billed Gull
California Gull
Herring Gull
Caspian Tern
Forster's Tern

   

Rock Dove
Mourning Dove
Common Ground-Dove
Greater Roadrunner
Burrowing Owl
White-throated Swift
Anna's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Gila Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Horned Lark
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Phainopepla
Rock Wren
House Wren
Marsh Wren
Northern Mockingbird
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Verdin
Loggerhead Shrike
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Abert's Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Great-tailed Grackle
House Finch
House Sparrow

Photos Bob Miller